The Hidden Dangers of Not Taking Care of Your Teeth

The Hidden Dangers of Not Taking Care of Your Teeth

Most people know the obvious dangers of not taking care of their teeth: Tooth Decay, Gum Disease, Bad Breath. But what about the hidden dangers? Did you know that Pneumonia, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Heart Disease are all linked to poor oral health? That’s right! It is vitally important to take care of your teeth and gums if you want to stay healthy and avoid these serious illnesses. In this blog post, we will discuss the hidden dangers of not taking care of your teeth, as well as some tips on how to properly care for them.

Obvious Dangers

Tooth Decay:

Tooth decay is caused by bacteria that build up on the teeth and release acids that eat away at the enamel. This can lead to cavities, which are holes in the teeth. If left untreated, tooth decay can cause pain, infection, and even tooth loss.

man with horrible teeth

Gum Disease:

Gum disease is an infection of the gums that can lead to tooth loss. It is caused by plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms on the teeth. If not removed with regular oral hygiene, plaque hardens into tartar, which irritates the gums and leads to inflammation. Over time, the bacteria that accumulates will eventually infect the gum tissue.

Bad Breath:

Bad breath is caused by bacteria in the mouth that release sulfur compounds. These compounds make the breath smell unpleasant. Bad breath can be embarrassing and cause social anxiety. It can also be a symptom of gum disease or tooth decay.

Low Self-Esteem:

Poor oral health can lead to low self-esteem. This is because people who are not confident in their smile are often less likely to interact with others. This can lead to social isolation and depression.

Hidden Dangers

Pneumonia:

Pneumonia is a lung infection that can be deadly. It is caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi that enter the lungs through the mouth. Poor oral health increases the risk of pneumonia because it allows bacteria to travel from the mouth to the lungs.

Diabetes:

There is a close relationship between diabetes and gum disease. People with diabetes are more likely to develop gum disease. This is because diabetes lowers the body’s ability to fight infection. Gum disease can also make it harder to control blood sugar levels. On the other side, people with gum disease are also more likely to develop diabetes, since gum disease causes inflammation within the body.

Rheumatoid Arthritis:

stethoscope and blood pressure cuff

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints. RA can be caused by bacteria in the mouth that enter the bloodstream and trigger the immune system. Poor oral health increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis because it allows these bacteria to enter the bloodstream. Once bacteria has entered the bloodstream, it continues the inflammation and makes RA symptoms more severe.

Heart Disease:

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It is caused by plaque buildup in the arteries, which can restrict blood flow and lead to a heart attack. Poor oral health increases the risk of heart disease because it allows plaque to build up in the arteries.

There are many ways to prevent these hidden dangers. The best way to avoid them is to practice good oral hygiene. This means brushing your teeth twice a day, flossing daily, and visiting the dentist regularly. By taking care of your teeth, you can avoid these serious illnesses and keep your mouth healthy!

In Conclusion

In this blog post, we have discussed the hidden dangers of not taking care of your teeth. We have also listed some tips on how to properly care for them. Remember, it is vitally important to take care of your teeth and gums if you want to stay healthy and avoid these serious illnesses. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us. We would be more than happy to help you in any way we can. Thanks for reading!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

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