If you are experiencing pain or discomfort when chewing, it might be time to visit your dentist. Chances are, you will need a dental restoration to fix the problem. There are two main types of indirect fillings: inlays and onlays. If you’re like most people, you probably don’t know the difference between an inlay and an onlay. And that’s okay!  In this blog post, we will compare the two and help you decide which is best for you!

What is an indirect filling?

Before discussing which is best for you, we need to understand the basics of dental inlays and onlays. For starters, both restorations are known as indirect fillings. An indirect filling is a type of dental restoration that is used to fill cavities or repair cracked or broken teeth. Indirect fillings are made outside of the mouth and are then bonded to the tooth. They are usually made from materials such as gold, porcelain, or composite resin.

Dental Inlay
Dental Inlay

The main difference between an inlay and onlay is the size of the restoration, as well as where it is located. An inlay is used to restore a small area of tooth decay and is bonded to within the center of the tooth’s chewing surface. Onlays, on the other hand, are used to restore larger areas of tooth decay or damage. With an onlay, either the entire chewing surface is restored and/or one or more of the tooth’s cusps.

To place an inlay or onlay, two dental appointments are generally required. During the first appointment, the tooth is prepared for restoration. This involves removing any decay or damaged tissue. Once the tooth is prepared, an impression is made and sent to a dental laboratory where the inlay or onlay will be fabricated.

During your second appointment, the inlay or onlay will be checked for fit and then bonded to the tooth using dental cement. The margins are then polished to ensure a seamless fit between the restoration and your natural tooth structure.

Which is Best?

Dental Onlay
Dental Onlay

Inlays and onlays are often used in cases where the area affected by tooth decay is too large to adequately restore with a composite filling, but not severe enough to warrant the placement of a dental crown. In these cases, an inlay or onlay can be placed as a way of restoring the tooth, while preserving the majority of its natural, healthy structure.

So, which type of indirect filling is best for you? The answer to this question depends on several factors. These include the size of the cavity, the location of the cavity, and the severity of the tooth decay.

In general, inlays are best for small cavities located within the center of the tooth’s chewing surface. Onlays are best for larger cavities that affect one or more of the tooth’s cusps.

If you’re not sure which type of indirect filling is right for you, schedule an appointment with your dentist. They will be able to assess your needs and make a recommendation based on your individual case.

In Conclusion

In this blog, we have compared dental inlays and onlays. We’ve discussed the basics of indirect fillings and the difference between an inlay and onlay. And finally, we’ve helped you decide which type of restoration is best for you!

If you think you might need a dental inlay or onlay, don’t hesitate to contact our office to schedule an appointment. We would be more than happy to help you restore your smile!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

We all know that person. The one who always has bad breath, no matter what they do. It can be embarrassing and oftentimes, people don’t even want to be around them. But did you know that bad breath is more than just a social inconvenience? In fact, it can be a sign of something much more serious. In this blog post, we will discuss the many causes of bad breath and how to get rid of it for good!

What is halitosis?

So, what exactly is halitosis? Halitosis is the medical term for bad breath. It can be caused by a number of different factors and oftentimes, it is a symptom of another underlying condition. Some common symptoms of halitosis include bad breath that persists even after brushing your teeth and/or a sour or metallic taste in your mouth.

Causes of Bad Breath

There are many different factors that can cause bad breath. Some of the most common include:

bacteria

Bacteria:

The bacteria that live in your mouth thrive on leftover food particles. When these particles are not removed, bacteria feed on them and release foul-smelling waste products. More bacteria equals more odors.

Foods/Drinks:

Certain foods and drinks can cause bad breath. Common offenders include garlic, onions, coffee, and alcohol. This is because they have strong odors that linger in the mouth. They can also affect the way you breath smells once they are digested and absorbed into the body.

Poor Oral Hygiene:

If you don’t brush and floss your teeth regularly, the food and bacteria in your mouth will begin to decompose and cause bad breath. In addition, if you don’t remove plaque from your teeth, it can harden and turn into tartar. Tartar is a breeding ground for bacteria and can cause bad breath.

Sugar:

Sugar is a food source for the bacteria in your mouth. When these bacteria break down sugar, they release acidic gasses that can cause bad breath.

Smoking:

Smoking is a major cause of bad breath. The tar and nicotine in cigarettes coat your teeth and tongue, which leads to an increase in bacteria. In addition, smoking dries out your mouth and decreases saliva production. Saliva is important because it helps to remove food particles and bacteria from your mouth.

Digestive Problems:

Digestive problems such as GERD, gastritis, and Crohn’s disease can cause bad breath. This is because they allow stomach acids to flow back up into the esophagus. When these acids mix with the bacteria in your mouth, they release foul-smelling gases.

Dry Mouth:

Dry mouth is a condition where there is not enough saliva in your mouth. This can be caused by medications, medical conditions, or simply not drinking enough water. Without saliva to remove food particles and bacteria, they begin to decompose and cause bad breath.

Gum Disease:

Gum disease is an infection of the gums that can be caused by plaque buildup. When plaque hardens into tartar, it irritates the gums and causes them to become inflamed. This inflammation can lead to gum disease, which can cause bad breath.

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath

toothpaste on toothbrush

Now that we know the many different causes of bad breath, let’s discuss how to get rid of it. The first step is to practice good oral hygiene. This means brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing once a day. In addition, you should brush your tongue or use a tongue scraper to remove bacteria. You should also see your dentist regularly for professional cleanings.

If you are a smoker, quitting smoking is the best way to get rid of bad breath. If you have a dry mouth, there are a few things you can do to help. Chew sugar-free gum or suck on sugar-free candy to stimulate saliva production. You should also avoid alcohol and caffeine, which can cause dehydration. In addition, try to drink six to eight glasses of water each day.

In Conclusion

In this blog, we have discussed bad breath and its many causes. We have also discussed how to get rid of bad breath. If you are concerned about your breath, the best thing to do is to see your dentist. They will be able to determine if you have gum disease or another condition that is causing your bad breath. Thanks for reading!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

We all know that a beautiful smile is important. It can make us feel more confident and help us get ahead in life. That’s why it’s no surprise that one of the most common reasons people visit a cosmetic dentist is because they are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth. However, do you know what the number one reason for visiting a cosmetic dentist is? In this blog, we’ll discuss the number one reason to visit a cosmetic dentist: stained teeth. We will also mention other reasons why people might visit a cosmetic dentist, such as crooked teeth, receding gums, and spaces between the teeth, as well as some treatments that can help.

The Number One Cosmetic Dental Concern

woman covering her teeth in embarrassment

A recent article by the New York Post notes that 7 out of 10 people feel self-conscious about their smile. When asked what their reasons were, the top concern was that their teeth were not white and instead appeared stained.

Teeth can become stained for a variety of reasons. For example, many foods and drinks can cause staining, including coffee, tea, and red wine. Smoking is also a major culprit when it comes to staining teeth. Over time, these stains can become more and more difficult to remove with basic brushing and flossing.

Cosmetic Whitening Treatments

Fortunately, there are treatments available that can help. Teeth whitening is a popular treatment for stained teeth. This procedure uses bleaching agents to remove the stains from your teeth, giving you a brighter, whiter smile. If your teeth are severely stained or yellowed, you may need to visit a cosmetic dentist for professional teeth whitening.

Another option for treating stained teeth is veneers. Veneers are thin, porcelain shells that are placed over the front of your teeth. They can be used to cover up stains as well as other imperfections, such as chips or cracks.

Composite bonding is another treatment that can be used to cover up stained teeth. With this procedure, a tooth-colored resin is applied to the teeth and then hardened with a special light. This helps to improve the appearance of your smile and can also be used to fill in spaces between the teeth.

Other Common Cosmetic Dental Concerns

While stained teeth are one of the most common reasons people visit a cosmetic dentist, the article also noted that crooked teeth, receding gums, and spaces between the teeth also made the list of common cosmetic concerns.

Luckily, these imperfections can also be corrected using one or more cosmetic dental treatments. Like stained teeth, crooked teeth or teeth with spaces between them can be corrected using veneers or composite bonding. Orthodontic treatment can also provide a permanent solution. Even gum recession can be treated using periodontal procedures aimed at improving the health and appearance of the gum tissue.

In Conclusion

In this blog, we’ve discussed the number one reason why people visit a cosmetic dentist: stained teeth. We’ve also mentioned some other common reasons, such as crooked teeth, receding gums, and spaces between the teeth. Finally, we’ve provided some information on treatments that can help improve the appearance of your smile, including teeth whitening, veneers, and composite bonding. Nowadays, having a beautiful smile that you can be proud of is easier than ever. If you’re unhappy with your smile, be sure to consult a cosmetic dentist to find out what treatment options are available to you.

If you have any questions or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact our office. We would be happy to help you achieve the smile of your dreams!

Thank you for reading! We hope this blog was helpful.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Do you have one or more missing teeth? Are your dentures loose and uncomfortable? Do you struggle to chew your food? If so, dental implants may be the right solution for you! Dental implants are artificial tooth roots (posts) that are implanted into the jawbone. The post is then connected to an artificial tooth or teeth. Dental implants can be used to replace a single tooth or an entire set of teeth. They look and feel like natural teeth, and they allow you to eat and speak normally. Here are nine signs that you need a dental implant:

You have an Infected Tooth

Teeth can become infected for a variety of reasons, including decay, gum disease, and trauma. If you have an infected tooth, you will often have the choice between root canal therapy and extracting the tooth. Your dentist may recommend an extraction if you have already had a failed root canal or if the infection is severe. Once the tooth is removed, you can choose to replace it with a dental implant.

You Have a Broken Tooth

If you have a broken tooth, it can be extremely painful. In some cases, the tooth can be repaired with a filling, crown, or veneer. However, if the tooth is severely damaged or the root has been affected, your dentist may recommend that it be extracted. Once the tooth is removed, you can replace it with a dental implant.

You Have One or More Missing Teeth

before and after dental implants

If you have one or more missing teeth, you may be self-conscious about your smile. Not to mention you are at an increased risk for other dental issues down the line. Dental implants can be used to replace one or more missing teeth, giving you a natural-looking smile and preventing future issues that are common with missing teeth.

You Struggle to Chew Food

If you have lost one or more teeth, you may struggle to chew your food. This can make eating a difficult and uncomfortable experience. Dental implants can help you to eat normally by restoring your ability to chew properly.

Your Dental Bridge is Loose

If you have a dental bridge, you may have noticed that it is becoming loose. This can be extremely uncomfortable and make it difficult to eat and speak normally. A loose bridge can also damage the surrounding teeth and gums. Dental implants can be used to secure your dental bridge, so you can feel confident that it will stay in place.

You Feel Insecure About Your Smile

If you are self-conscious about your smile due to damaged, decayed, or missing teeth, dental implants can help you to feel more confident. Dental implants look and feel like natural teeth, so no one will be able to tell that you have them.

Your Face Has a Sunken-In Appearance

If you have lost one or more teeth, your face may have a sunken-in appearance. This is because the bone that supports the tooth roots starts to deteriorate when the teeth are lost. Dental implants can help to prevent this bone loss and keep your face looking youthful.

Your Dentures Are Loose

If you wear dentures, you may have noticed that they are becoming loose. This can be extremely uncomfortable and make it difficult to eat and speak normally. Dental implants can be used to secure your dentures, so you can feel confident that they will stay in place.

You Don’t Want to Deal With Dentures

If you are tired of dealing with dentures that are loose and uncomfortable, dental implants may be the right solution for you. Dental implants are permanent and will not need to be replaced like dentures.

In Conclusion

If you are experiencing any of these problems, dental implants may be the right solution for you. Be sure to talk to your dentist about whether or not dental implants are right for you.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Are you looking for a way to improve the look of your smile? If you’re considering dental veneers to improve your smile, you’re in good company! Veneers are one of the most popular cosmetic procedures in the world. A veneer is a thin shell of porcelain or composite that is bonded to the front surface of a tooth. They are made of durable materials that can last for many years with proper care. In this blog post, we will discuss how to keep your veneers white and looking their best!

What are Veneers?

There are two types of veneers: porcelain and composite. Porcelain veneers are made of a ceramic material that is durable and can last for many years. Porcelain veneers are usually placed in two appointments. The first appointment is to take impressions of your teeth and to place a temporary veneer on your tooth. A dental lab will then fabricate the veneers and the second appointment is used to place the permanent porcelain veneer on your tooth.

scattered veneers on a black background

Composite veneers are made of a plastic material that is less durable than porcelain, but can be less expensive. Composite veneers are placed in a single appointment. The dentist will roughen the surface of your tooth and then apply a bonding agent. The composite material is then placed on top of the bonding agent and sculpted into shape. A curing light is then used to harden the composite material.

Dental veneers are an excellent way to improve the look of your smile. They can be used to correct a wide variety of imperfections, including:

How to Keep Your Veneers White

When it comes to keeping your veneers white, it is important to note that composite veneers stain easier than porcelain. Porcelain veneers are made to be stain-resistant, although they can still stain if they become damaged. With proper care, your veneers can last for many years. Here are some tips on how to keep your veneers looking their best:

Good Oral Hygiene:

This is the most important factor in keeping your veneers white and healthy. Be sure to brush twice a day and floss regularly. This removes plaque from the surface of your veneers and minimizes the chances of it hardening into tartar.

Schedule Regular Teeth Cleanings:

Be sure to see your dentist or hygienist every six months for a professional cleaning. Professional cleanings remove plaque and tartar, which keeps your veneers looking clean. They also keep the underlying teeth healthy and free from decay.

stained cartoon tooth in coffee next to a white tooth in water

Minimize Drinking Certain Beverages:

Dark colas, coffee, tea, and red wine can all cause staining on teeth. If you do drink these beverages, try using a straw and be sure to brush afterwards or rinse your mouth with water.

Use a Soft Bristled Toothbrush:

Hard bristled toothbrushes can be damaging to veneers since they can scratch the porcelain and lead to stains. Instead, using a soft bristled toothbrush will help avoid scratching the surface of your veneers.

Wear a Night Guard:

If you grind your teeth at night, be sure to wear a night guard to protect your veneers. Night guards are designed to fit over the teeth in order to prevent your teeth and veneers from being chipped, cracked, or worn down from excess grinding.

By following these simple tips, you can keep your veneers looking their best for many years to come! Thanks for reading! And be sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist if you have any questions.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

When you are considering a smile makeover, one of the first things you need to decide is what treatment to use. Two common cosmetic dental treatments used for smile makeovers are teeth whitening and cosmetic bonding. Although these procedures are often performed individually, they can also be performed in coordination to offer more dramatic results. In this blog post, we will discuss the benefits of both procedures and why teeth whitening should always be done before dental bonding.

Teeth Whitening

woman with shade guide for teeth whitening

Teeth whitening is a popular cosmetic dental procedure that can be used to improve the appearance of your smile. The treatment involves using a bleaching agent to remove stains and discoloration from your teeth. Teeth whitening is an affordable, non-invasive way to achieve a brighter, more youthful-looking smile.

There are two types of teeth whitening: in-office and at-home. In-office teeth whitening is performed by a dental professional and offers the quickest, most dramatic results. At-home teeth whitening uses a bleaching kit that you can use in the comfort of your own home. Although it takes longer to see results, at-home teeth whitening is a more affordable option.

No matter which type of teeth whitening you choose, the results are not permanent. The length of time your results will last depends on the type of staining you have and how well you take care of your teeth. You can help prolong your teeth whitening results by avoiding foods and drinks that can stain your teeth and by practicing good oral hygiene.

Cosmetic Bonding

dental bonding repairing a chipped tooth

Cosmetic bonding is another popular cosmetic dental procedure that can be used to improve the appearance of your smile. The treatment involves using a tooth-colored resin to repair chipped, cracked, or discolored teeth. Cosmetic bonding can also be used to close gaps between teeth and change the shape or size of teeth.

Cosmetic bonding is a quick, easy, and affordable way to improve the appearance of your smile. The procedure can be completed in one office visit and does not require any anesthesia. Unlike veneers or crowns, cosmetic bonding does not require any alteration to your natural teeth.

Although cosmetic bonding can be performed on its own, it is often used in conjunction with other cosmetic dental procedures, such as teeth whitening. When used together, these procedures can offer dramatic results.

Why Teeth Whitening Should Be Done Before Dental Bonding

If you are considering a smile makeover with both teeth whitening and cosmetic bonding, it is important to have your teeth whitened first. Teeth whitening will remove any existing stains or discoloration from your teeth. This will ensure that your bonding resin is the same color as your natural teeth.

If you have your cosmetic bonding done first, any staining or discoloration that occurs after the procedure will be visible and can make your bonding material stand out. By having your teeth whitened first, you can avoid this issue and achieve a more natural-looking result.

In Conclusion

If you are considering a smile makeover and have questions about which treatment is right for you, contact our office today to schedule a consultation with our experienced cosmetic dentist. Dr. Sadati will work with you to create a personalized treatment plan that meets your unique needs and goals.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Did you know that the best way to floss is to floss correctly? Flossing is an essential component of oral health, but it might be tough to know how to do it correctly. In this blog post, we will describe the best way to floss your teeth. First, we will explain the importance of flossing and how it benefits oral health. Then, we will provide a step-by-step explanation on how to properly floss. Finally, we will list additional flossing tips to help improve your flossing routine.

To Floss or Not to Floss…

…that is the question. Ask any dental professional and the answer is a resounding “to floss!” Flossing helps remove plaque and bacteria from teeth and gums that brushing alone cannot reach. Plaque is a sticky film of food debris, bacteria, and saliva. When plaque is not removed, it hardens into tartar (calculus). This can happen 48 hours after plaque first forms on the surface of the teeth. Not only is tartar unsightly and unable to be removed by a toothbrush, it can also contribute to gum disease and tooth decay. This is why it is necessary to floss daily to ensure that as much plaque is removed as possible.

The Best Way to Floss Your Teeth

Step 1:

The first step in flossing correctly is to choose the right type of floss for your needs. There are many different types of floss on the market, so be sure to ask your dentist or hygienist for a recommendation. Once you have the right type of floss, you can move on to the next step.

Step 2:

The second step is to cut off a piece of floss that is about 18 inches long. This will give you enough floss to work with and will help avoid waste.

view of woman flossing from the side

Step 3:

Once you have your piece of floss, the third step is to wind the extra floss around your middle fingers. Then, use your thumbs and index fingers to hold the floss so that you have about two inches of floss to work with.

Step 4:

The fourth step is to hold the floss tightly between your thumbs and index fingers and gently work it in between two teeth. Then, slide the floss up and down against each tooth, taking care not to smack the gums. When you reach the gums, you will then want to curve the floss into a C shape so that it can move into the space between the tooth and gums.

Step 5:

The fifth and final step is to repeat this process, being sure to use a clean section of floss for each tooth. This will help ensure that you are not re-introducing plaque and bacteria into your mouth. Also, don’t forget to floss behind your back teeth!

Additional Flossing Tips:

water flosser

In Conclusion

Flossing correctly is an important part of oral health. By following the steps above, you can be sure that you are doing everything possible to keep your teeth and gums healthy. In addition, be sure to visit your dentist or hygienist regularly for professional cleanings and check-ups. They will be able to give you additional tips on how to improve your oral health routine.

Happy flossing!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Dental sedation has become a popular option for people who are fearful of the dentist. It can help to calm patients and make their dental visit more comfortable. But is sedation dentistry safe? In this blog post, we will discuss the different types of dental sedation and how they are administered. We will also talk about how sedation affects the body and what to expect when under sedation. Finally, we will talk about who is an ideal candidate for dental sedation and who may be at an increased risk of complications. We will list specific conditions where dental sedation is not recommended.

Types of Dental Sedation

Oral sedation is taken by pill form an hour before the appointment. The pill will make you drowsy but you will still be awake during your appointment.

Inhaled sedation, also known as nitrous oxide or laughing gas, is a gas that you will breathe in through a small mask during your appointment. It will make you feel relaxed but you will still be awake during your procedure.

How Sedation Affects the Body

inhaled sedation

Dental sedation affects the body by causing drowsiness and relaxation. There are different levels of sedation that can affect your body differently:

Minimal Sedation – You will be awake and responsive but relaxed.

Moderate Sedation – You will be awake and drowsy, however you may slur your words and not remember the procedure.

Deep Sedation – You will be on the verge of passing out, may fall into a light sleep, and will not remember the procedure.

After undergoing dental sedation, you may not be able to drive yourself home after your appointment. You will need someone to drive you home and stay with you for at least 24 hours after your procedure. Sedation can cause memory loss, so you may not remember much of your appointment. You may also have trouble speaking and moving during your procedure.

Candidates for Dental Sedation

Ideal candidates for dental sedation are people who have a fear of the dentist, a sensitive gag reflex, or who need to have a lengthy or complex procedure done. People with heart conditions, lung disease, or severe allergies are at an increased risk of complications and are not ideal candidates for dental sedation.

Is Sedation Dentistry Safe?

Yes, sedation dentistry is safe when administered by a licensed dentist. The level of sedation will be determined by the dentist based on your medical history and the procedure that you are having done. Dental sedation is a safe and effective way to make your dental appointment more comfortable. Talk to your dentist about whether sedation dentistry is right for you.

In Conclusion

In this blog, we discussed the different types of dental sedation and how they are administered. We also talked about how sedation affects the body and what to expect when under sedation. Finally, we talked about who is an ideal candidate for dental sedation and who may be at an increased risk of complications. As you can see, dental sedation is a safe and effective way to make your dental appointment more comfortable. Talk to your dentist about whether sedation dentistry is right for you.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

If you’re missing a tooth, you may be considering getting a prosthetic tooth. Prosthetic teeth come in many different shapes and sizes, and can be made from a variety of materials. In this blog post, we will describe the steps involved in making a prosthetic tooth, from taking impressions to fitting the tooth in your mouth. We’ll also discuss the different types of prosthetics and materials that can be used to make a prosthetic tooth.

problems caused by missing tooth

Do You Need a Prosthetic?

If you’re missing one or more teeth, chances are that your dentist will recommend having a dental prosthetic placed. It is important to replace missing teeth with a prosthetic in order to avoid future complications such as problems eating and speaking, overgrowth, bite problems, shifting teeth, and damaged teeth.

Types of Prosthetics

There are many different types of prosthetics available, and the type that is right for you will depend on the number of teeth you are missing, your budget, and your personal preferences.

Dental Bridge

A dental bridge is used to replace one or more missing teeth. The bridge is made up of two crowns (caps) that are placed over the adjacent teeth, and one or more false teeth (pontics) in between. The pontics are usually made from porcelain or ceramic.

Dental Implant

A dental implant is a metal post that is placed into the jawbone to serve as a tooth root replacement. A dental prosthetic (crown, bridge, or denture) is then attached to the metal post. Dental implants are considered to be the most stable and durable type of prosthetic.

Dentures

Dentures are used to replace all of the teeth in the upper or lower jaw. They are made up of false teeth (pontics) that are attached to a pink-colored base that resembles gum tissue. The base is then held in place by suction or adhesive. Complete dentures can be made from a variety of materials, including porcelain, plastic, or metal.

How Prosthetic Teeth are Made

If you’re missing a tooth, the first step is to schedule an appointment with your dentist. During this appointment, your dentist will take impressions of your teeth. These impressions will be used to make a model of your mouth, which will be used to create your prosthetic tooth.

prosthetic teeth being fabricated by hand

Once the model of your mouth is created, your dentist will select the materials that will be used to make your prosthetic tooth. There are many different types of materials that can be used, including porcelain, composite resin, and acrylic. Your dentist will select the material that is best suited for your individual needs.

Once the material is selected, a dental lab will create the prosthetic tooth. This process will vary depending on the type of material that is used. After the prosthetic tooth is created, it will be fitted into your mouth. Your dentist will make any necessary adjustments to ensure a comfortable and secure fit.

If you’re considering getting a prosthetic tooth, we hope this blog post has been helpful. If you have any questions, we encourage you to schedule an appointment with your dentist. They will be able to answer any questions you may have and help you decide if a prosthetic tooth is right for you. Thanks for reading!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Did you know that April is National Facial Protection Month? This is a time to raise awareness about the importance of wearing mouthguards. A mouthguard is a piece of plastic that fits over your teeth and helps protect them from injuries. Wearing a mouthguard can prevent many dental problems, including tooth loss, chipped teeth, fractures, and even concussions! In this blog post, we will discuss the different dental problems that can be avoided by using a mouthguard.

What is a mouthguard?

orange mouthguard

A mouthguard is a piece of plastic that fits over your teeth and helps protect them from injuries. Mouthguards are usually worn during sports, but they can also be worn at night to help prevent grinding of the teeth (bruxism). There are three different types of mouthguards:

– Stock mouthguards: These are the least expensive and are ready-made. They are not as comfortable or effective as the other types of mouthguards.

– Boil-and-bite mouthguards: These are made from a piece of plastic that you soften in boiling water and then bite into to form it to your teeth. These are more comfortable and effective than stock mouthguards, but they can still be bulky. Be sure to look for the ADA Seal of Approval to get the best over the counter mouthguard. 

– Custom-made mouthguards: These are made by your dentist to fit your teeth exactly. They are the most comfortable and effective type of mouthguard, but they are also the most expensive.

Why should you wear a mouthguard?

There are many reasons why you should wear a mouthguard, but the most important reason is to protect your teeth! Here are some other reasons why you should wear a mouthguard:

– To prevent tooth loss:

A blow to the face can cause your teeth to be knocked out. Depending on the damage, knocked out teeth may be restored, but in many cases they need to be replaced by a dental prosthetic, such as an implant. Wearing a mouthguard can help protect your teeth and reduce the risk of tooth loss.

chipped tooth

– To prevent chipped teeth:

A blow to the face can also cause your teeth to chip. Chipped teeth can be painful and require treatment by a dentist. Besides affecting the look of your smile, chipped teeth can also allow bacteria inside the tooth, which increases your risk of developing a pulp infection. Wearing a mouthguard can help prevent chipped teeth.

– To prevent fractures:

A blow to the face can cause a fracture of the jawbone or the teeth. Treatment of a jaw fracture usually requires surgery, which can be costly and may require a lengthy recovery period. A tooth fracture can usually be restored when it occurs on the crown, however fractures that occur on the tooth roots are harder to treat. Oftentimes, a tooth with fractured roots will need to be extracted to prevent infection. Wearing a mouthguard can help prevent fractures of both the teeth and jaw.

– To prevent concussions:

A concussion is a type of brain injury that can occur after a blow to the head. Concussions can cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and confusion. In some cases, concussions can also cause long-term damage. Wearing a mouthguard can help reduce the risk of concussions by absorbing some of the impact from a blow to the face.

In Conclusion

Mouthguards are an important part of protecting your teeth and should be worn any time you are participating in a sport or activity where there is a risk of injury to the face. Custom-made mouthguards are the most effective, but even stock mouthguards can provide some protection. Be sure to talk to your dentist about which type of mouthguard is right for you.

Happy National Facial Protection Month! Wear a mouthguard and help protect your smile!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

This blog is in honor of Oral Cancer Awareness Month. This month is a time when we focus on educating people about the dangers of oral cancer and how to prevent it. Oral cancer is a type of cancer that affects various structures in the mouth and and throat. In this blog post, we will discuss what oral cancer is, as well as some common symptoms and risk factors of oral cancer. We will also provide five tips for preventing this type of cancer.

What is Oral Cancer?

Oral cancer is a broad term that includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheeks, floor of the mouth, hard and soft palate, sinuses, and pharynx (throat). Oral cancer is often first detected by a dentist during a routine checkup. This is why it is important to see your dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings.

Early detection of oral cancer is important because it can often be cured if caught in the early stages. However, if oral cancer is not detected early, it can spread to other parts of the body and become more difficult to treat.

oral cancer on tongue

Some common symptoms of oral cancer include:

Risk Factors of Oral Cancer

There are several risk factors that can increase your risk of developing oral cancer, including:

-Tobacco use: This is the most common risk factor for oral cancer. Cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and chew are all forms of tobacco that can increase your risk.

-Alcohol use: Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol also increases your risk of developing oral cancer.

-UV light exposure: Spending time in the sun or using tanning beds can increase your risk of developing lip cancer.

-HPV exposure: Individuals who have had the human papillomavirus (HPV) are more likely to develop oral cancer. 

-Age: The risk of developing oral cancer increases with age. Most people are over the age of 55 when diagnosed.

-Gender: Men are two times more likely than women to develop oral cancer.

Preventing Oral Cancer

There are several things you can do to reduce your risk of developing oral cancer, including:

Quit smoking:

dental exam

This is the most important thing you can do to reduce your risk. In fact, stopping the use of any and all tobacco products is highly recommended to decrease the risk of oral cancer.

Limit alcohol consumption:

If you drink alcohol, be sure to limit the amount of drinks you consume weekly. The CDC notes that 8 drinks or more per week for women and 15 or more drinkers per week for men is considered heavy drinking.

Practice safe sun exposure:

Avoid spending too much time in the sun and use sunscreen when you are outdoors. You can also use an SPF lip balm to protect your lips when you are outside.

Visit Your Dentist

Be sure to see your dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings. During your regular checkups, your dentist will perform a basic oral cancer screening where they will look for any early signs of oral cancer. You should be examined at least twice a year.

Eat a healthy diet:

Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and limit processed foods. This keeps you more healthy overall and can reduce the risk of cancer.

In Conclusion

Oral cancer is a serious disease that can be deadly if not detected early. By following these tips, you can help prevent oral cancer. Remember, if you notice any changes in your mouth or throat, see your dentist right away. Thanks for reading and have a healthy day!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

When it comes to severe tooth decay, there are two main treatment options: root canal treatment or tooth extractions. Both treatments have their pros and cons, and it can be difficult to decide which option is best for you. In this blog post, we will compare root canal treatment and tooth extractions in detail. We will define both treatments, explain the steps involved, and discuss the pros and cons of each option. Finally, we will decide which treatment option is best and explain why.

Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment is a common procedure that is used to treat severe tooth decay. Root canal treatment is performed in cases where tooth decay has reached the innermost layer, known as the dental pulp. Since this layer is composed of blood vessels and the tooth nerve, infected pulp tissue tends to cause moderate to severe tooth pain. Unfortunately, once the pulp tissue has been infected, the only way to treat the infection is to completely remove all the infected tissue.

root canal therapy

Root canal treatment is performed to remove the infected tissue from the tooth. The first step of root canal treatment is to make a small hole in the tooth. Special tools are then placed into this hole and used to remove the infected tissue. Next, the empty pulp chamber and root canals are cleaned and sealed. Finally, a crown or filling is placed over the tooth to protect it from further damage.

The main pro of root canal treatment is that it can save the tooth. In many cases, root canal treatment is able to preserve the natural structure of the tooth and prevent the need for a tooth extraction. The main con of root canal treatment is that it can be expensive and time-consuming. There is also the risk that a root canal may fail and the tooth may become infected again.

Tooth Extractions

tooth extraction

Tooth extractions are a procedure that is used to remove damaged or infected teeth. The first step of a tooth extraction is to numb the area around the tooth. Next, the dentist will use special tools to loosen the tooth and remove it from the socket. Finally, the socket will be cleaned. In some cases, a dental implant may also be placed immediately after a tooth extraction.

The main pro of a tooth extraction is that it is usually less expensive than root canal treatment. The main con of a tooth extraction is that it can cause long-term problems if the affected tooth is not immediately replaced. In some cases, tooth extractions can lead to jawbone loss or changes in bite.

Which is Best?

So, which treatment option is best? It depends on the individual situation. If you have severe tooth decay, root canal treatment may be the best option for you. However, if you have a severely damaged tooth or recurring pulp infection, a tooth extraction may be the best option. Ultimately, the decision should be made by you and your dentist since there are multiple factors that go into making this decision.

We hope this blog post was helpful in deciding whether root canal treatment or tooth extractions is best for you. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to us. Thanks for reading!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

In order to have healthy teeth, it is important to know the truth about them. Unfortunately, there are many myths out there that can lead people astray when it comes to taking care of their pearly whites. In this blog post, we will debunk seven of the most common myths about teeth. Stay informed and keep your teeth healthy by reading on!

Myth #1: White teeth are healthy teeth.

teeth shade guide

The Truth: While white teeth may look good, they are not always an indication of a healthy mouth. In fact, many people can have perfectly healthy teeth that are not white. Conversely, some people may have unhealthy teeth that are still very white. This is because the natural tooth color is actually slightly tinted with yellow, red, or gray. The health of your teeth is more dependent on your oral hygiene habits than the color of your teeth.

Myth #2: Sugar rots teeth.

The Truth: It is not sugar itself that harms teeth, but rather the bacteria that feed on sugar. These bacteria produce acids that can break down tooth enamel and lead to decay. Therefore, it is important to brush and floss regularly to remove the sugar and bacteria from your mouth.

Myth #3: Baby teeth are not important.

The Truth: Baby teeth are actually very important for several reasons. First, they help guide permanent teeth into place. Second, they aid in chewing and speaking properly. Finally, baby teeth serve as a placeholder for adult teeth. Therefore, it is important to take care of baby teeth just as you would permanent teeth.

Myth #4: Teeth deteriorate with age.

The Truth: While it is true that teeth may yellow or become less strong with age, this does not mean that they will automatically deteriorate. Tooth loss is not a normal part of aging and it can be prevented by practicing good oral hygiene. With proper care, your teeth can stay healthy and strong well into old age.

Myth #5: Teeth whitening can hurt your teeth.

The Truth: When done correctly, teeth whitening is a safe and effective way to brighten your smile. However, it is important to consult with your dentist before undergoing any teeth whitening treatment, as certain products may not be suitable for your individual needs. In some cases, over the counter whitening products can potentially damage your teeth when they are not used properly. To prevent the risk of damage, you can have your teeth professionally whitened in a dental office.

three layers of a tooth

Myth #6: Teeth are bones.

The Truth: Teeth are not actually bones, but rather a combination of hard and soft tissues. The hard outer layer of teeth is called enamel, while the softer inner layer is called dental pulp. In between the two layers lies the dentin, which is a porous layer that is weaker than enamel, but stronger than dental pulp. Together, these three tissues make up the tooth’s structure.

Myth #7: Tooth sensitivity is only caused by a loss of tooth enamel.

The Truth: While tooth enamel erosion can certainly lead to tooth sensitivity, there are other causes as well. Some common reasons for tooth sensitivity include gum recession, dental cavities, and exposed roots. If you are experiencing sensitivity in your teeth, be sure to consult with your dentist to find the underlying cause.

In Conclusion

We hope that this blog post has helped to debunk some of the myths about teeth. Remember, proper oral hygiene is essential for keeping your teeth healthy and strong. If you have any concerns about your oral health, be sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Do you grind your teeth at night? If so, you may have bruxism. Bruxism is a condition that causes people to grind their teeth and clench their jaw involuntarily. It can lead to a number of problems, including worn enamel, damaged teeth, tooth sensitivity, pain, and sleep problems. Luckily, there is treatment available for bruxism. In this blog post, we will discuss how to tell if you have bruxism and what treatments are available.

What is Bruxism?

First things first, we need to define bruxism. Bruxism is a condition that causes people to grind their teeth and clench their jaw involuntarily. It can occur during the day or at night, but most people do not realize they are doing it. In many cases, bruxism occurs at night while sleeping. Bruxism is often caused by stress or anxiety, but it can also be caused by other factors, such as sleep apnea or misaligned teeth.

What are the Symptoms of Bruxism?

Since most cases of bruxism occur at night while sleeping, it can be hard to know if you are a bruxer or not. However, one effective way to tell is by looking for symptoms. There are a number of symptoms that can indicate you have bruxism. These include:

Worn enamel

If you notice that your teeth are looking more worn than usual, it could be a sign that you are grinding your teeth at night. For example, if the grooves and pits of your molars are becoming flatter, then this could indicate that you are a bruxer.

fractured tooth and root

Damaged teeth

Teeth grinding can also cause significant damage to your teeth. If you notice that your teeth are cracked, chipped, or broken, and you cannot account for a reason why, then it is likely because of bruxism.

Tooth sensitivity

Bruxism can also lead to tooth sensitivity. If you are experiencing pain when drinking hot or cold beverages, it may be a sign that you are a bruxer. However, tooth sensitivity can have a number of causes, so it is important that you discuss this with your dentist to determine what is causing your sensitivity.

Pain

Grinding your teeth can also cause pain in your jaw, head, or neck. If you are experiencing any of these types of pain, it could be a sign that you have bruxism. Another common location for pain is inside the ear canal, just above the jaw joint. In some cases, you may also experience tinnitus, or a ringing in your ears.

Sleep problems

Bruxism can also lead to sleep problems. People who grind their teeth at night may have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. If you are having difficulty sleeping or are waking up feeling not well rested, it could be due to bruxism.

How is bruxism treated?

One of the most common treatments for bruxism is wearing a night guard. A night guard is a mouthguard that you wear while you sleep. It protects your teeth and jaw from grinding and clenching. If you think you may have bruxism, talk to your dentist about whether a night guard is right for you.

If you think you may have bruxism, don’t wait to get treatment. The sooner you start treatment, the better. If you have any questions about bruxism or night guards, please feel free to contact us. We would be happy to help! Thank you for reading.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

It’s no secret that dental fillings are an important part of oral care. They are also one of the most commonly performed dental procedures. But what do you really know about them? In this blog post, we will be filling you in all about dental fillings. First, we will discuss the different types of fillings and why they are necessary. We’ll also talk about how they are placed and how long they last. Finally, we’ll discuss signs that you may need to have your fillings replaced.

Dental fillings are a type of dental restoration that are used to fill in cavities. Fillings are necessary because they help to restore a tooth’s function and structure. When a tooth is damaged, it can cause pain and make it difficult to eat or speak. Fillings also help to prevent further damage to the tooth by sealing off any cracks or cavities.

They are made of a variety of materials, including metal, porcelain, and composite resin. There are two main types of dental fillings:

Direct Fillings

Direct fillings are placed into a tooth cavity that has been cleaned and prepared by a dentist. Composite, or tooth-colored, fillings are one of the most common types of direct fillings used today. Another type is amalgam fillings, although these are not nearly as common since they have a metallic appearance.

indirect filling

Indirect Fillings

Indirect fillings are made outside of the mouth and then bonded or cemented into place. There are two types of indirect fillings: inlays and onlays. An inlay is a type of indirect filling that is used to fill cavities located on the biting surface of a tooth. Onlays are similar to inlays, but they are used to fill the space on the biting surface of a tooth in addition to one or more of the tooth’s cusps.

Placing a Dental Filling

composite filling

Fillings are placed by a dentist. The procedure is relatively simple and direct fillings can be completed in one visit. Indirect fillings, on the other hand, usually require a minimum of two appointments. To place a composite filling, your dentist will first clean the tooth and then remove any decay. Next, they will place the composite resin material into the cavity and shape it to match the surrounding teeth. Finally, they will harden the filling with a light or laser.

Like direct fillings, an indirect filling is placed by first cleaning the tooth and removing the decayed tissue. Then, your dentist will take an impression of the teeth and provide you with a temporary restoration. This impression is then sent to a dental lab, where the permanent inlay or onlay is made. The permanent inlay or onlay is then bonded or cemented into place.

Fillings can last for many years, but eventually they may need to be replaced. Direct fillings tend to last about 5-7 years, while inlays and onlays usually last around 10-15 years. This discrepancy is simply due to the fact that different dental materials are used.

Regardless of the type of filling you get, signs that you may need a new filling include pain, sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures, and visible cracks or chips in the filling. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, be sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist.

We hope that this blog post has filled you in on all you need to know about dental fillings. If you have any questions, be sure to ask your dentist at your next appointment. Thanks for reading!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Sinus pressure is a common problem that can cause a lot of pain and discomfort. But did you know that sinus pressure can also cause toothaches? Many people don’t realize this. In this blog post, we will discuss the link between sinus pressure and toothaches, and how to tell the difference between sinus pressure and an actual toothache caused by a dental problem. We will also provide some tips on how to relieve sinus pressure and get rid of your toothache!

How the Sinuses and Teeth are Related

sketch of toothache caused by maxillary sinus pressure

You may be surprised to find out that your sinuses can affect your teeth. However this will start to make sense once you learn a little about facial anatomy. For starters, your teeth have roots that extend underneath your gums into the jawbone. In your upper teeth, these roots extend upwards.

Your sinus cavities are located right above your upper teeth on either side of your nose. The openings of these cavities are called the ostia, and they are located in the ethmoid bone between your eyes. When you have a cold or sinus infection, the mucous membranes inside your nose become swollen and congested. This can block the ostia and prevent drainage from the sinuses. This can lead to pressure and pain in the sinuses, which can also cause pressure on the tooth roots just below the sinus cavities.

Sinus Pressure vs. Toothache

Now that we know a little more about facial anatomy and how your sinuses can affect your teeth, let’s look at how to tell the difference between a toothache due to sinus pressure and a toothache due to dental issues.

Sinus pressure is caused by inflammation and swelling in the sinus cavities. This can be due to a number of factors, such as allergies, a cold or flu, or nasal polyps. When the sinuses are inflamed, they can put pressure on the teeth and cause toothache-like pain. The pain may be sharp and stabbing, or it may be a dull ache. It can be difficult to tell the difference between sinus pressure and an actual toothache caused by a dental problem. However, there are some clues that can help you differentiate between the two.

If your toothache is accompanied by fever, facial swelling, and discharge from the nose, then it is likely that you are experiencing a sinus infection. In this case, the best thing to do is see your doctor for treatment. You may also experience a toothache due to sinus pressure that isn’t an infection. In these cases, you can use steam therapy by taking a hot shower or putting your head over a bowl of hot water and inhaling steam. This helps to relieve sinus pressure and alleviate the toothache. However, if your toothache does not go away, then it may be caused by a dental issue. If you are experiencing severe pain, it is best to see a dentist right away so they can determine the cause of your toothache and provide appropriate treatment.

In Conclusion

If you are experiencing sinus pressure or toothache, we recommend seeing your dentist as soon as possible to determine the cause of your pain and get appropriate treatment! We can help figure out if it’s just a simple case of sinus congestion causing pressure on the teeth, or something more serious like an infection or cavity that needs to be treated by a professional.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Did you know there are many different types of dental specialists? Dental specialists are dentists who have completed an additional two to three years of training in a specific area of dentistry. There are many different types of dental specialists, each with their own unique set of skills and knowledge. In some cases, your dentist may refer you to one if they feel that you need specialized care. In this blog post, we will discuss the six most common types of dental specialists and when your dentist may refer you to one.

Cosmetic Dentist:

A cosmetic dentist is a dentist who specializes in improving the appearance of your smile. They often perform procedures such as teeth whitening, dental veneers, and/or other treatments to improve the look of your smile. If you have concerns about the aesthetic aspects of your smile, or if you would like to make improvements to it, your dentist may refer you to a cosmetic dentist. While many general dentists claim to perform cosmetic dentistry, there is a huge difference between a general dentist and a cosmetic dentist. For this reason, it is important to look for a cosmetic dentist who is certified by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, such as Dr. Sadati.

Endodontist:

An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in treating the nerves and tissues inside of the teeth. They often perform root canal therapy, which is when they remove the infected or damaged tissue from inside of the tooth. If you are experiencing pain or other symptoms that may be indicative of a problem with your nerves or tissues, your dentist may refer you to an endodontist. Although most general dentists can perform root canals, they may refer you to an endodontist if you have narrow or twisting root canals, or if root canal treatment fails.

Orthodontist:

colorful braces

An orthodontist is a dentist who specializes in straightening teeth and correcting bite problems. They often use braces, clear aligners, and/or other orthodontic devices to achieve these results. If you are experiencing problems with your teeth or jaw alignment, your dentist may refer you to an orthodontist. While some dentists do offer Invisalign® treatment for mild cases, they may recommend seeing an orthodontist if your case is moderate or severe.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon:

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon is a dentist who specializes in surgery on the mouth, jaws, and face. They perform surgeries such as wisdom tooth removal, corrective jaw surgery, and reconstructive surgeries. If you are experiencing problems with your teeth, gums, or jaw that require surgery, your dentist may refer you to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Although many dentists can perform wisdom teeth extractions, they may refer you to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon if your anatomy may complicate a basic extraction.

Periodontist:

A periodontist is a dentist who specializes in treating gum disease. They often perform procedures such as scaling and root planing, which are used to remove plaque and tartar from the teeth and gums. They can also perform gum grafts and other types of gum surgery. If you are experiencing symptoms of gum disease, such as redness, swelling, or bleeding gums, your dentist may refer you to a periodontist.

Prosthodontist:

A prosthodontist is a dentist who specializes in dental restorations. They often perform procedures such as dental implants, dentures, and crowns. If you are in need of extensive dental restoration, your dentist may refer you to a prosthodontist. Your dentist may also refer you to a prosthodontist in order to maintain an existing or new dental restoration.

As you can see, there are many different types of dental specialists. If you are experiencing any problems with your teeth or gums, your dentist may refer you to one of these specialists.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Most people know that alcohol can have negative effects on the body, but many don’t realize how it can also affect oral health. In this blog post, we will discuss how alcohol can cause cavities, gum disease, and other dental problems. We will also provide tips for reducing the risks of these problems. So if you’re a fan of happy hours or like to indulge in a glass of wine with dinner, read on! You’ll learn what you need to do to protect your teeth and gums.

Alcohol and Your Oral Health

Like other things that you eat or drink, alcohol does have an effect on your oral health. Generally speaking, however, the effect that alcohol has on your oral health is due to the amount of alcohol that you consume, as well as how regularly you consume alcoholic beverages. This is where it is important to know the difference between moderate and excessive alcohol consumption.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines moderate alcohol consumption as one drink per day for women and up to two drinks a day for men, and heavy drinking as more than eight drinks per week for women and more than fifteen drinks per week for men. In most cases, the risk of oral health complications is greatest for those who consume excessive amounts of alcohol. However, these risks still exist for moderate drinkers as well. Here are some of the ways that alcohol can affect your oral health:

mojito

Increases the Risk of Tooth Decay

One of the most well-known effects of alcohol on oral health is that it increases the risk of tooth decay and cavities. This is because alcohol breaks down into sugar, which is then consumed by oral bacteria. Oral bacteria convert these sugars into acidic waste that erodes the enamel. The more erosion that takes place, the weaker the enamel becomes until eventually a cavity forms.

Increases Risk of Gum Disease

Not only does alcohol break down into sugars that make tooth decay more likely, but it can also cause more plaque to form. Plaque is a sticky film that builds up on teeth and contains oral bacteria. If not removed, plaque can harden into tartar over time, which leads to the development of gum disease (also known as periodontal disease). Not only that, but a recent study found that people who drink more alcohol have higher levels of “bad” bacteria and lower levels of “good” bacteria. This can also increase the risk for gum disease.

Dry Mouth

Another effect of alcohol on oral health is that it can cause dry mouth. This is because the salivary glands in your mouth produce less saliva when you drink, which means there’s less to wash away bacteria from food particles and other debris in the mouth. Dry mouths are more prone to tooth decay and gum disease than those with normal levels of saliva. Dry mouth can also lead to bad breath.

How to Reduce Risks from Alcohol Consumption

Now that you know some of the ways that alcohol consumption can affect your oral health, you’re probably wondering how to reduce the risks. One of the best ways to keep your teeth and gums healthy is by brushing your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, as well as flossing at least once per day. Another important way to protect your oral health is by making sure to stay hydrated while drinking alcohol and to minimize sipping on sugary drinks. Finally, regular dental exams and cleanings are recommended.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

If you’re like most people, you probably think of cavities as those little holes that form in your teeth. But what about cavities that form along the gum line? These are known as gum line cavities, and they can be a real problem for your oral health. In this blog post, we will discuss what causes gum line cavities, how to prevent them, and how to treat them if they do occur.

When it comes to cavities, there are three main types. These include smooth surface cavities, biting surface cavities, and root cavities. Smooth surface cavities are those that form on the smooth surfaces of your teeth, such as the fronts, backs, sides, and in between your teeth. Biting surface cavities, also known as pit and fissure cavities, form on the chewing surfaces of your teeth. Root cavities are cavities that occur below the gum line on the tooth roots.

A gum line cavity is not a specific type of cavity, rather it can be classified as either a smooth surface or root cavity.  Cavities that form near the gums, but above the gum line are considered smooth surface cavities, while those that develop on the tooth roots below the gums are known as root cavities. In some cases, gum recession can also cause cavities to form on exposed tooth roots. These would also be considered root cavities.

What Causes Gum Line Cavities?

gum recession

Like other cavities, the main cause of gum line cavities is plaque accumulation. Plaque is a sticky film of bacteria that forms on your teeth and can cause tooth decay and other dental problems if not removed regularly with brushing and flossing. This is because the bacteria in plaque produce acids that can erode your tooth enamel, leading to the development of cavities.

Gum line cavities can form when plaque accumulates along the gum line. When plaque is not removed regularly, it can harden into calculus (tartar). Calculus is a mineralized plaque that cannot be removed with brushing and flossing. The combination of plaque, tartar, and bacteria can cause gum inflammation (gingivitis). When this happens, it leads to gum recession, which is when the gums pull away from the teeth.

As the gums recede, they expose the tooth roots. Since tooth roots are coated with cementum instead of enamel, gum recession makes them more susceptible to cavities. Root cavities are also more likely to develop at a faster rate since cementum is weak compared to enamel and bacteria can erode through it faster.

How to Treat Gum Line Cavities

The best way to treat gum line cavities is to prevent them from occurring in the first place. This can be done by brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, using a fluoride toothpaste, and seeing your dentist for regular checkups.

If you do develop a gum line cavity, your dentist will likely recommend a dental treatment plan that depends on the exact location of your gum line cavity. For example, smooth surface cavities that have eroded through the tooth enamel can usually be repaired with composite fillings. Some root cavities may be able to be restored this way as well.

However, root cavities that have extended below the gums may require more extensive treatment. This is usually due to the fact that your dentist is unable to visualize and treat the entire cavity since it is concealed below the gums. In these cases, a root canal and/or minor gum surgery may be required. Ultimately, only your dentist can determine the best course of action once they evaluate your cavity.

In Conclusion

Gum line cavities are a type of cavity that can form on the smooth surfaces of your teeth or on exposed tooth roots. The main cause of gum line cavities is plaque accumulation, which can lead to tooth decay and gingivitis. If you develop a gum line cavity, your dentist will likely recommend a treatment plan that depends on the exact location of your cavity. In most cases, gum line cavities can be treated with composite fillings or a root canal and/or minor gum surgery. Prevention is the best way to avoid developing gum line cavities in the first place. This can be done by brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, using a fluoride toothpaste, and seeing your dentist for regular checkups.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Dental implants are the closest to natural teeth as you can get. Just like natural teeth, however, dental implants are not invincible. The success of dental implants is dependent on a number of factors, from the dentist who places them to the patient’s compliance with post-operative guidelines. This article will discuss how to prevent implant failure by looking at two important topics: common causes for implant failure and prevention strategies that will help increase your odds of successful dental implant placement.

Common Causes of Implant Failure

Infection

infected dental implant

Infection is the number one cause of implant failure because infection around the implant site can damage the surrounding bone and compromise the implant. In most cases, infections are due to bacteria that accumulates along the gum line. Infections that affect the implants are known as peri-implant diseases.

Poor Implant Placement

Poor implant placement is another common reason for implant failure. When implants are not placed correctly, they can become loose and eventually fail. Implants may also be placed incorrectly due to inaccurate dental impressions that leave tiny gaps between the implant and the gums where bacteria can enter.

Inadequate Oral Hygiene

Inadequate oral hygiene is also a leading cause of implant failure. If plaque and bacteria are not regularly cleaned from the implant site, an infection can form in the gums and spread to the bone eventually leading to implant failure.

Smoking/Alcohol Consumption

Smoking and excess alcohol consumption can also increase the risk of implant failure. Nicotine and other chemicals in cigarettes can damage the bone and gum tissue around the implant, while alcohol can interfere with the healing process.

Strategies to Prevent Dental Implant Failure

There are a number of things you can do to prevent dental implant failure. These include:

Selecting a Qualified Implant Dentist

First, it is important to select a qualified implant dentist. Although many dentists advertise they can place dental implants, not all dentists have the same level of experience. Someone who has extensive experience placing implants and has a good track record for success is more likely to give you a good outcome. Therefore, it is important to do your research and find an implant dentist with the necessary expertise.

Follow Postoperative Guidelines

Second, follow the postoperative guidelines closely. Even if you choose the best implant dentist in your area, failing to follow the postoperative guidelines can easily lead to implant failure. Oftentimes these guidelines include brushing and flossing regularly, avoiding hard food items, and scheduling regular checkups and cleanings. You may also be instructed to take certain medications or abstain from certain activities.

Practice Good Oral Hygiene

Third, practice good oral hygiene habits. Brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss daily. This is not only important in the weeks following your implant placement, but it is important to maintain your implants over time. As mentioned above, inadequate oral hygiene can cause bacteria to accumulate around the implant. This can lead to infection, even once the implant has healed.

Avoid Smoking & Excess Alcohol Consumption

Fourth, avoid smoking and excess alcohol consumption. Both smoking and drinking excessive amounts of alcohol can weaken bone and gum tissue, lead to dry mouth, and alter blood flow, all of which can negatively affect your dental implants, oral health, and overall health.

Schedule Regular Checkups and Cleanings

Finally, you will need to schedule regular dental checkups and cleanings. A professional cleaning every six months will remove plaque and bacteria from your implant-supported restorations and gums, helping to prevent implant failure. Checkups every six months will also allow your dentist to ensure that your implants are healthy and functioning properly. In the case that something is wrong, regular checkups also allow your dentist to correct the problem before it gets really bad.

Preventing dental implant failure can seem like a daunting task, but if you follow these simple steps, you can increase your chances of a successful implant outcome. By selecting a qualified implant dentist, following postoperative guidelines, practicing good oral hygiene, avoiding smoking and excess alcohol consumption, and scheduling regular checkups and cleanings you can help to ensure the long-term success of your dental implants.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

It’s the new year and we’re looking forward to giving our teeth a fresh start. We’ve got some of the best cosmetic dental treatments for you! Dental implants, veneers, and composite fillings are just a few ways that we can help get your smile on track in 2022. It’s important to take care of your teeth so that they look their best. We want to help you have a smile that you can be proud of. This year, let us work with you on fixing any issues or concerns that you may have about your teeth! Here are a few ways we can help you start 2022 off with a smile:

Teeth Whitening:

Teeth whitening treatments are designed to remove stains and brighten your smile. The process for teeth whitening can vary depending on the type of treatment you choose, but commonly involves applying a hydrogen peroxide gel to your teeth and leaving it place for a designated amount of time. Our office offers both in-office and at-home whitening treatments. We find that in-office whitening treatments are the most effective and that they can brighten your teeth up to eight shades! However

man with nice smile

Dental Implants:

If you have one or more missing teeth, dental implants are a great way to replace missing teeth. Not only do they look natural, but they also feel natural and help keep your jawbone healthy. Dental implants are titanium posts that are implanted into the jawbone and used to support a dental prosthetic. Depending on the number of missing teeth, dental implants can be used with a crown, bridge, or denture. Dental implants are the best way to replace missing teeth because they mimic the look and function of natural teeth.

Veneers:

Veneers are another great way to improve the appearance of your teeth. Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain that are bonded to the front of your teeth. They are a great way to fix crooked teeth, gaps, and thin enamel. Veneers can also alter the size, shape, and color of your teeth in order to make them more appealing. Veneers are a highly popular treatment because they can fix a range of concerns all at once.

Composite Fillings:

Composite fillings are a great way to restore decayed or damaged teeth. They are commonly used to fill in small to medium areas of tooth decay, however they can also be used to repair chips or cracks in the enamel. In some cases, composite can even be used to close a small gap between the teeth. Composite fillings are made out of tooth-colored dental composite, so they blend in with your natural teeth.

With so many beautiful options, you’re bound to find the right cosmetic dental treatment for your smile. Whether it’s teeth whitening or veneers, there is something that will give your smile a new lease on life in 2022! Our team would be happy to answer any questions about these services or even book an appointment today. We can’t wait to start this year off by helping make your teeth look their absolute best. Which one of these treatments sound like the perfect fit? Come in to our office today and let us discuss your options!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

I’m sure you’ve seen people smile and thought, “Wow! That person has a beautiful smile!” They have the perfect teeth, they’re not missing any of them, and their gum line is flawless. While some people are lucky enough to be born with perfect smiles, cosmetic dentists can help anyone get a flawless smile. If you have been considering a smile makeover, you may be wondering: what does it take to get a smile makeover? This blog post will help answer that question by discussing all the factors cosmetic dentists use to complete a smile makeover.

Smile Design Principles

One of the first things your cosmetic dentist will need to consider are the four principles of smile design. These include:

Facial Aesthetics

One of the most important aspects of smile design is facial aesthetics. Your cosmetic dentist will look at your face and determine how smiling, speaking, and laughing affect your overall appearance. They will also take into account other factors such as skin tone, hair color, and bone structure when designing your smile makeover.

Gum Aesthetics

Another critical aspect of designing a cosmetic dentist’s work is gum aesthetics, or the appearance and health of your gums. This includes looking at how much gum tissue you have as well as determining whether it is unevenly distributed across your teeth and if there are any irregularities present such as pockmarks or color changes.

Microesthetics

In addition to facial and gum aesthetics, your cosmetic dentist will also look at microesthetics, which are all of the subtle factors that affect the appearance of your teeth. This includes translucency, unique markings, and individual anatomy. Each tooth is different and requires a unique approach when it comes to restoring or replacing it.

Macroesthetics

Finally, there is macroesthetics which combine the look of your teeth with surrounding tissue and facial characteristics to create an overall picture of how your smile will look after you receive a cosmetic dental treatment such as veneers. For example, if someone’s lower front teeth are too long their facial features may be elongated which will need to be taken into consideration when designing their smile makeover.

Anatomical Components

In addition to the four principles of smile design, your cosmetic dentist will also evaluate the various anatomical components that make up your smile. This will allow them to create a treatment plan that is unique to your anatomy, but that will improve the appearance of your smile. Here are the structures that your cosmetic dentist will evaluate:

Lips:

The lips play a major role in overall smile aesthetics since they essentially act as a frame for your smile. A cosmetic dentist can add fullness to thin lips or improve their shape to give your smile a more youthful appearance. From an aesthetic standpoint, your lips also affect the appearance of your teeth.

Midline:

dental midlline

The midline is an imaginary line that runs down the center of your face from between your eyebrows to Cupid’s bow in the center of the upper lip. It’s important to have a symmetrical midline, as deviations can cause an uneven appearance when you smile. Therefore, your dentist will line up the upper front teeth with the facial midline. In some cases where this is not possible, then the midline between the central incisors should be perpendicular to a line drawn from one corner of the mouth to the other.

Smile Line:

The smile line is composed of your lower lip. Ideally, the tips of your upper teeth should all line up so that they are parallel with your lower lip and your lower lip should line up with the gums of your lower jaw. Your dentist will use this information to determine the length of restorations such as crowns or veneers.

Teeth:

There are a number of things to consider when it comes to your teeth. In fact, a large part of a smile makeover deals with improving the appearance of the teeth. Your cosmetic dentist will look at factors such as tooth color, shape, size, and alignment. They will also consider things like size proportions of one tooth to another, the texture of each tooth, the way each tooth is angled, and whether or not the upper teeth meet the lower teeth correctly. Once they have evaluated all these factors, your cosmetic dentist may recommend dental treatments such as whitening, contouring, or orthodontics to achieve the desired results.

Gums:

Just like with the teeth, your dentist will evaluate the appearance of your gums. In some cases, the gums may be too visible or not visible enough. They may also be uneven in color, shape, or size. The gum line may also have a semi oval or circular shape depending on the tooth. If necessary, your dentist can perform a gum reshaping procedure to improve their appearance.

Incisional Edge Position:

The incisional edge is how far down the upper middle teeth extend. The foundation of your smile line, and smile makeover, is dependent on the incisional edge. Not only that, but the incisional edge is responsible for allowing proper speech and the pronunciation of “F” and “V” sounds.

buccal corridor

Buccal Corridor:

The buccal corridor is the space that appears between your teeth and cheeks in the corners of your mouth when you smile. Aesthetically, small buccal corridors are associated with attractive smiles.

Emergence Profile:

The emergence profile refers to the angulation of your teeth when viewed from the side. This angle determines how full or sunken a person’s smile appears. Generally speaking, fullness gives a more youthful appearance and is desired. However, too much angulation can take away from an aesthetic appearance. Therefore, your cosmetic dentist will take care to determine the appropriate angle.

In Conclusion:

A Cosmetic Dental Smile Makeover is a process that involves evaluating all aspects of your smile, whether it be the teeth or other facial structures. It takes into consideration the many factors associated with an attractive facial appearance including the lips, midline, smile line, teeth, gums, incisal edge position, buccal corridor, and emergence profile. When these are combined together they can achieve optimal results for any patient. If you are considering a smile makeover, be sure to consult with your cosmetic dentist to see if it is the right choice for you.

Thank you for reading! We hope this article was helpful in understanding some of the factors that go into a Cosmetic Dental Smile Makeover. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please contact The Sadati Center for Aesthetic Dentistry in West Palm Beach today!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Malocclusion is a common dental condition that can affect your oral health. The word itself means “bad bite” and it occurs when the upper teeth do not meet up with the lower teeth in the proper position. This can lead to many different problems including pain, difficulty chewing food, TMJ disorder, facial asymmetry and more. In this blog post we will discuss malocclusion and how it affects your oral health.

Types of Malocclusion

For starters, it is important to know what a properly aligned bite looks like. In a properly aligned bite, the upper jaw slightly overlaps the lower jaw. This allows the points on your upper teeth to fit into the grooves of your lower teeth. If this does not happen, then you likely have malocclusion.

There are different types of malocclusion, depending on how your bite is aligned. These include:

Underbite

An underbite is when the lower front teeth are in front of the upper front teeth. This is frequently caused by an overgrowth of the bottom jaw, but it can also be due to thumb-sucking or prolonged pacifier use during childhood.

Overbite

An overbite is when the upper front teeth extend significantly over the lower front teeth, often exposing an excessive amount of gum tissue. This type may also be caused by thumb-sucking or prolonged pacifier use during childhood and it can lead to problems with chewing food properly, speech difficulties and other dental issues such as tooth decay due to increased plaque build-up.

Crossbite

A crossbite is when the upper teeth bite inside the lower teeth, on either the front or back side. This can be caused by several different factors such as a narrow jaw, enlarged tonsils or adenoids, incorrect tooth eruption and more. It can also be a result of thumb-sucking or prolonged pacifier use during childhood.

Your dentist will diagnose malocclusion by its type and severity. For diagnostic purposes, there are three categories of malocclusion:

How Malocclusion Affects Oral Health

Now that you know a little bit about the different types of malocclusion and its diagnostic classes, let’s discuss how it can affect your oral health. As we mentioned earlier, malocclusion can lead to many different problems including pain, difficulty chewing food, TMJ disorder, facial asymmetry and more. In most cases, the effect malocclusion has on oral health is dependent on its severity.

One of the most common problems caused by malocclusion is tooth decay. This is because when the teeth are not in the proper position, it can be difficult to keep them clean and free of plaque and bacteria. This is especially the case when the teeth are overcrowded and may overlap one another. Plaque build-up can cause tooth decay and other dental problems.

TMJ disorder is another common problem caused by malocclusion. TMJ disorder is a condition that affects the jaw joint and can cause pain, stiffness, locking of the jaw and more. It is often triggered by misalignment of the teeth or jaws. Unfortunately, this misalignment places more strain on the jaw joint, which eventually leads to TMD.

Facial asymmetry is another common problem caused by malocclusion. This is when one side of the face appears different from the other, due to differences in the position of the teeth or jaws. Malocclusion can also affect your side profile. For example, an overbite can make your chin look weak or less pronounced when viewed from the side.

If you are experiencing any of these problems, it is important to see a dentist for evaluation and treatment. Early detection and treatment of malocclusion can help prevent serious problems from occurring. While your exact treatment will vary, there are a number of ways that your dentist can help you correct malocclusion to improve your oral health and appearance.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Gum recession is a common problem in adults. Besides the fact that gum recession makes your teeth look abnormally long, it can also negatively impact your oral health. Chances are, you are reading this blog post because you have receding gums, or know someone who does. We’ll discuss what causes gum recession in the first place, and offer some treatment options in this article.

What is Gum Recession?

receding gums

Gum recession is a condition in which the gums around the teeth pull down or away from the teeth. This exposes more of your tooth, specifically the tooth root. It’s not just an esthetic problem either- gum recession can cause tooth decay and periodontal pockets to form.

Gum recession increases the risk of tooth decay because tooth roots have less enamel than the part of your tooth above the gum line. Since the tooth roots are normally covered by gum tissue, this is normally not a problem. However, when the roots are exposed, it is easier for bacteria to eat away at the surface of the tooth roots, causing cavities.

Healthy gums fit tightly around the tooth, whereas gums affected by gum recession are loosely fitted around the base of the teeth. As a result, spaces form between the teeth and gums called periodontal pockets. These gaps are prime real estate for bacteria to grow, which can cause gum disease, tooth decay, or both! Not to mention the fact that it makes gum recession worse.

What Causes Gum Recession?

There are a few different things that can contribute to gum recession:

How is Gum Recession Treated?

Gum recession treatment varies depending on how severe it is. For mild cases, simply brushing and flossing your teeth regularly can help to stop the recession. If you have moderate or severe gum recession, however, you may need to see a dentist for treatment.

Some common treatments for gum recession include:

Periodontal Scaling and Root Planing:

This is a deep cleaning treatment that involves two parts: scaling and root planing. Scaling is a technique used to remove the build-up of plaque and bacteria from the surface of the teeth and the tooth roots. Root planing is a process that smooths the root surfaces, which makes it harder for plaque to adhere in the future.

Gum grafting:

gum graft

In this procedure, the dentist takes a piece of healthy gum tissue from another part of your mouth and transplants it to the area where you have gum recession. The surrounding tissue will then cover over the roots, stopping further damage from occurring. In addition to stopping gum recession, gum grafts also prevent both tooth decay and bone loss.

Home Care:

In order to prevent gum recession from progressing, it is important to practice good oral hygiene habits. This includes brushing your teeth twice a day with a soft bristled toothbrush, flossing regularly, and avoiding smoking and sugary foods and drinks.

Regular Dental Exams:

When you have gum recession, it is important to stay caught up with your dental appointments and cleanings to prevent it from becoming worse. It is recommended to see your dentist for a professional cleaning and check-up at least twice a year.

In Conclusion

Gum recession is a serious problem that can be caused by a number of factors. The best way to prevent this condition from worsening is by practicing good oral hygiene habits, such as brushing your teeth twice a day with a soft bristled toothbrush and flossing regularly. If you are diagnosed with mild or moderate gum recession, your dentist may also recommend a specialized cleaning. However, if the gums are severely recessed a gum graft may be the most effective treatment option because it will stop further damage. Finally, it is important to see your dentist for regular check-ups and cleanings in order to maintain healthy teeth and gums.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Morning is a time to wake up and start your day, but what if you woke up with tooth pain? It’s never a good feeling waking up with tooth pain in the morning. We all know that tooth pain is no joke. It can range from a little discomfort to an unbearable ache and everything in between. This blog post will discuss 7 reasons why you may be experiencing morning tooth pain.

Bruxism:

woman grinding her teeth while sleeping

This is a condition in which you grind your teeth at night while sleeping. Bruxism is a common cause of tooth pain in the morning, as well as morning headaches, jaw pain, and earaches. Many people who grind their teeth at night do not even realize that they are doing it. In fact, bruxism is usually diagnosed when your dentist notices wear marks on your teeth. Over time, bruxism can cause the teeth to become damaged, which can also contribute to tooth pain. If you find yourself frequently waking up with sore teeth and/or jaw in the morning, then schedule an appointment with your dentist to be examined for bruxism.

Cavities

Tooth pain in the morning can also be caused by cavities.  Cavities are small holes that can develop in your teeth when the bacteria from plaque erodes your tooth enamel. As it continues to eat away at the enamel of your teeth, the cavity will become larger and deeper. When decay reaches the inside of the tooth, this can cause a painful pulp infection.

Gum Disease:

There are many factors that can cause gum disease including smoking, diabetes and poor oral hygiene. Gum disease causes swollen gums to form around the tooth causing pain when chewing, eating, or brushing. Gingivitis is an early stage of gum disease where there are swollen gums and bleeding when brushing. Periodontitis is the more advanced stage of gum disease where there are deep pockets between the teeth and your gums, as well as bone loss around the tooth. Both stages of gum disease can cause your gums to become painful, which can also make your teeth hurt. 

Impaction

An impacted tooth can also cause tooth pain in the morning, as well as throughout the day.  An impacted tooth is one that does not have enough space to erupt into the mouth. As it continues to grow, it will become stuck under the gum or bone surrounding the teeth. This can cause pressure and pain when chewing certain foods, as well as general soreness in your jawbone. If you are experiencing any symptoms of an impacted tooth such as pain in your jaw, ear pain or teeth shifting positions, schedule an appointment with your dentist.

sinusitis

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is a common cause of tooth pain, especially in the mornings.  When you experience sinusitis, it means that the sinus cavities in your face are inflamed, swollen, and filled with fluid. This causes facial pressure that can hit the tooth nerves, causing pain in the upper teeth just below the sinus cavities. Sinusitis is also usually accompanied by other symptoms such as a sinus headache, postnasal drip, cough, nasal congestion, and fever.

TMD

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) can also cause tooth pain in the morning, especially when accompanied by bruxism. TMD is a disorder in which the jaw joint and the surrounding muscles are strained or tense, causing pain in your jaws, head, and neck. Bruxism has been found to increase the risk of TMD, which is why morning tooth pain can be caused by a combination of these conditions. Like bruxism, TMD can also cause morning headaches, facial pain, and problems chewing.

Tooth Abscess

An infected tooth can also cause pain in the morning, as well as throughout the day.  An abscess is a collection of pus that forms around an infection deep within your tooth or gums. It causes pressure and inflammation which will make it hurt to bite down on foods. Other symptoms include fever, bad breath, swelling of the face, and pain radiating from the infected tooth. If you suspect that your tooth is abscessed, make an appointment to see a dentist immediately as it can cause serious damage if left untreated for too long.

Waking up with tooth pain is never fun, but it’s not always a sign of something more serious. If you find yourself waking up to sore teeth and jaw for no apparent reason, there are many conditions that could be causing this discomfort.  Bruxism can cause morning headaches as well as facial pain. TMD symptoms include painful jaws and neck muscles, which will often make your teeth hurt too. Tooth abscesses are the most severe of all these cases because they can lead to infection if left untreated or damage other parts of your mouth including sinuses. Whatever the cause may be, schedule an appointment with your dentist right away so they can diagnose what’s going on before things get worse!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

It can be scary to have a root canal, but it is an important procedure that prevents tooth loss. Your dentist may recommend a root canal if you have a badly decayed or broken tooth, an abscessed tooth or an injury that has damaged the tooth’s pulp (layer under the dentin). To make the root canal process easier, there are three things you should know before having one:

#1 Root canals relieve pain…

…because they remove the infected section of your tooth. Pulpitis is an infection of the tissue in the center of your tooth that causes inflammation. Your dental pulp can become infected when decay-causing bacteria erode through the two outer layers of your teeth, namely the enamel and dentin.

Symptoms will vary depending on the cause and severity of the pulpitis but may include: sensitive teeth (which may be painful to touch or even bite down on), severe throbbing pain in or around a tooth, and a bad taste in your mouth. Oftentimes, the inflammation from the infection irritates the tooth nerve. By removing the infected tissue, root canals allow your tooth to heal and the inflammation to subside. During a root canal, the tooth nerve is also removed.

#2 Root canals prevent tooth loss by…

hollow tooth after a root canal

…removing bacteria that could lead to the loss of the affected tooth and surrounding teeth if left untreated. Pulp infections are one of the only bacterial infections that cannot be effectively treated with antibiotics. This means that once they enter the tooth, the only way to eliminate the infection is to remove the infected tissue. Without treatment, the infection will continue to spread, causing the tooth roots to abscess and the tooth to eventually fall out. There is also the risk of the infection spreading to the surrounding teeth.

Since pulp infections can only be treated by removing the source of infection, this means the only options are to extract the entire tooth or remove the infected tissue. Root canal therapy allows your dentist to remove the infected tissue within your tooth, while still preserving the remainder of the natural tooth structure. Retaining your natural teeth is always the best choice for your oral health and root canals allow you to do so.

#3 Dental crowns are essential…

…after a root canal since they protect the tooth. During a root canal, all the tissue inside your tooth is removed, leaving the root canals and pulp chamber empty. To prevent the tooth from collapsing in on itself, the tooth is then filled with a rubberized material known as gutta-percha. The access hole and/or cavity is filled with a dental filling. While both of these methods help provide support to the tooth, it is still necessary to place a dental crown over the top of the tooth. This is because the tooth’s structure has been compromised by decay and, although it has been restored, it is still weakened and more likely to become damaged or decayed in the future. Placing a dental crown decreases this risk.

If you are thinking about getting a root canal done, it is important to know what to expect before and after. A root canal relieves pain by removing the infected tissue within your tooth while still preserving its natural structure. Retaining teeth in general is always best for oral health so having this procedure performed will help protect that. Finally, placing a dental crown is necessary to protect the tooth from any future damage.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

When you think of an oral appliance, what comes to mind? Is it a mouthguard for athletes or a nightguard that can help with snoring? The truth is that there are many types of mouthguards available. Sports mouthguards and nightguards are the most common ones, but appliances for sleep apnea and snoring also exist. Today’s blog post will focus on why you should wear a mouthguard in order to protect your teeth!

Sports Mouthguards

A sports mouthguard protects all or most of the teeth from sports-related facial injuries. Some sports mouthguards are made to fit only over the upper teeth and gums, while others are made to fit over the top and bottom teeth. Oftentimes, it depends on the type of sport being played. Some reasons to wear a sports mouthguard include:

Protect your teeth from damage

boxer holding mouthguard

While playing sports, a blow to the face can easily result in a fractured or chipped tooth. Wearing a sports mouthguard decreases the likelihood of getting your teeth accidentally damaged. When a tooth becomes damaged, it is also more likely to become infected if bacteria is able to enter the tooth.

Prevent tooth loss or intrusion

Just as a blow to the face could cause teeth to become chipped or cracked, it can also cause the teeth to become loose or be knocked out. A loose tooth may be able to be saved, however a knocked out tooth will usually need to be replaced. In some cases, a blow to the face can also cause the tooth to be driven down into the jawbone. This is known as intrusion and it can have its own set of complications.

Protects soft tissues

The soft tissues in your mouth can also become injured while playing sports. Certain types of sports mouthguards are made to cover the gums as well as the teeth. If you have braces, then there are also special mouthguards that can cover your braces so that you avoid cutting the insides of your lips during sports play.

Lessen chance of injuring others

Contact sports are aptly named for the amount of close contact that players have with one another. In these cases, wearing a mouthguard not only protects you, but your opponent as well. Sports mouthguards encase the teeth, which makes it less likely to accidentally cut someone with your teeth or clash mouths.

Nightguards

A nightguard is a device that protects the teeth and jaw from nighttime bruxism (a condition in which grinding or clenching of the teeth occurs during sleep). It can also protect against cracks, fractures, and other injuries to your mouth. Some reasons to wear a nightguard include:

Alleviate Snoring

man putting a nightguard in his mouth

Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea are both conditions that can be caused by a misalignment of the upper and lower jaw. Snoring is caused by an obstruction of airflow while sleeping due to collapsed soft tissue at the back of your throat or tongue. This collapse causes vibrations that result in snoring. Night Guards are used to prevent the airway from collapsing, which in turn helps with snoring and sleep apnea.

Prevent damage from grinding teeth at night

Grinding your teeth causes wear over time on both the tooth enamel as well as the gum tissue surrounding your teeth. Over time, this can lead to a loss of the enamel as well as receding gums which could then result in cavities or bacteria entering into your gum line. Not to mention that regularly grinding your teeth at night can result in the development of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD).

Prevent damage from clenching at night

Clenching and grinding are different types of behavior that can occur while sleeping. Clenching is when two teeth are pressed together tightly. Clenching can also damage the tooth enamel and gum tissue, as well as cause your jaw muscles to become sore in the morning.

In Conclusion:

Wearing a mouthguard or night guard is an easy way to protect your teeth and overall oral health. They come in different shapes and sizes depending on the sport you play, but they all serve the same purpose: protecting your teeth from damage while playing sports. There are also mouthguards that can help with snoring or teeth grinding. To determine if you should be wearing a mouthguard and what type is appropriate for you, schedule a consultation with your West Palm Beach dentist today.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

Gum disease is one of the most common problems seen by dentists. If you are suffering from this problem, it can be very difficult to manage your oral health. Fortunately, there are lots of different treatments available to help manage gum disease. One treatment option that has been gaining popularity lately is probiotics. These supplements contain good bacteria that help fight bad bacteria in the body and may help improve gum health. This blog post will explain what probiotics are and explore how probiotics may be able to help treat gum disease.

What are Probiotics?

lactobacillus

Probiotics are composed of bacteria and yeasts found in foods or supplements that are taken to improve the overall health and balance of bacteria in the gut. Probiotics contain good bacteria, or “friendly” strains, which help fight bad, or disease-causing, bacteria in your body. In addition to balancing gut bacteria, probiotics also offer other health benefits for the urinary tract, skin, lungs, and mouth.

There are different types of probiotics. When it comes to your oral health, Lactobacilli have been named as possibly beneficial. Lactobacilli account for around 1% of cultivable oral bacteria. This form of bacteria has been found to both survive in the saliva and adhere to the surface of the teeth and gums.

The Role of Probiotics in Treating Gum Disease

Gum disease is the result of bacteria that build up in plaque on teeth and along the gum line. If left unchecked, these bacteria can damage the gums and bone around your teeth leading to pain, infection, bad breath, and tooth loss in the most severe of cases. The best way to fight this problem is by improving your oral hygiene so you are not allowing harmful bacteria to accumulate. In fact, treatments for gum disease revolve around reducing the amount of bacteria in the mouth, especially along the gum line.

Since probiotics have been known to decrease the amount of “bad” bacteria in the gut, researchers have started to evaluate whether this theory applies to the mouth as well. Some studies have found that people with chronic periodontitis have lower levels of L. gasseri and L. fermentum, than people with healthy gums. Other studies have shown L. gasseri and L. fermentum as being able to prevent growth of the bacteria responsible for gum disease.

While this could suggest that L. gasseri and L. fermentum can be used to treat gum disease, there is other research that has identified L. reuteri and L. brevis as being potentially effective in the treatment of gum disease. Both L. reuteri and L. brevis were used in people with gum disease for a specified amount of time.  L. reuteri was used in chewing gum, while L. brevis was used in lozenges. At the end of the designated time period, it was noted that the amount of plaque had decreased and that there was an overall improvement in inflammation.

Although the aforementioned research has found probiotics to be potentially beneficial in the treatment of gum disease, researchers still note that more research is necessary to fully understand the relationship between probiotics and gum disease. It is also important to note that the use of probiotics should only be used as a supplemental treatment for gum disease and should never be used to replace brushing, flossing, or regular dental cleanings, as these are still the most effective ways to manage gum disease.

In Conclusion

Research indicates that probiotics may be able to help treat gum disease. However, more research is needed to understand how these “good” strains of bacteria work and which strains are most beneficial in helping you maintain your oral health and treat gum disease. In the meantime, practicing good oral hygiene is still considered the best way to prevent and/or treat gum disease.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

cartoon of missing tooth

Losing teeth is no fun. It can leave you feeling self-conscious and less confident in your appearance, and it can even make eating difficult. But did you know that tooth loss might also increase your risk of dementia? This blog post will explore the connection between missing teeth and dementia, as well as why replacing missing teeth with dental implants could decrease your risk of developing this condition.

As many as 1 in 6 Americans over the age of 65 lack natural teeth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These numbers show that tooth loss is a serious problem among the elderly. When it comes to tooth loss in adults, the most common reason is periodontitis. Periodontitis is a severe form of gum disease that breaks down the supportive structures around the tooth. This causes the teeth to become loose, fall out, or need to be extracted.

cartoon of man with dementia

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also estimates that over 5 million individuals over the age of 65 are afflicted with dementia. While many people think dementia is a disease, it is actually a collection of symptoms associated with brain deterioration. These can include:  impairments with thinking, memory, and decision-making. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, however there are others as well. Dementia has no known cause at present, although risk factors include age, genetics, race/ethnicity, previous or current head injuries, smoking, and health issues such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Recently, however, tooth loss has also been added to that list.

Findings from a recent study published in the Journal of Post-Acute and Long-term Care Medicine by researchers at New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing has suggested a connection between tooth loss and dementia. This study evaluated 14 different longitudinal studies that included a total of 37,074 adults and 4,689 cases of adults with diminished cognitive function. What researchers found among these studies is listed below:

“…the relationship between the number of missing teeth and risk of diminished cognitive function substantially strengthens the evidence linking tooth loss to cognitive impairment, and provides some evidence that tooth loss may predict cognitive decline”

-Xiang Qi, a doctoral candidate at NYU Meyers

Despite the fact that this study implies a connection between tooth loss and dementia, researchers noted that they could not pinpoint an exact reason why tooth loss leads to dementia. One theory was that tooth loss causes problems with chewing that can lead to malnutrition. Another theory was that there is a connection between gum disease and cognitive decline, and that tooth loss was the result of gum disease. Finally, they also noted that life-long socioeconomic challenges could increase risk factors for both tooth loss and cognitive decline.

senior woman flossing in the mirror

Fortunately, there are dental prosthetic alternatives for individuals who have lost teeth. Dentures are one of the most popular prosthetic solutions and were discussed in the piece. Dental implants are another popular prosthetic alternative that was not mentioned in the article, but is nevertheless an ideal option for replacing missing teeth. Even though dentures can restore partial chewing function to prevent malnutrition, only dental implants can restore complete chewing function. Additionally, dental implants offer a more permanent solution to tooth loss since they are implanted into the jawbone and preserve the bone.

Missing teeth can lead to cognitive impairment and dementia. To protect yourself from these symptoms, consider getting dental implants to replace missing teeth. Better yet, practice good oral hygiene daily to decrease the risk of tooth loss.

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

National Dental Hygiene Month is here, and that means it’s time to brush up on teeth cleanings! Healthy teeth and gums are important for maintaining a healthy body. Yet, many people neglect their teeth because they do not understand the importance of dental cleanings. This blog post is designed to help educate you on what dental cleanings are, why they are important, and what happens during a dental cleaning.

national dental hygiene month

What are teeth cleanings?

A teeth cleaning, also called a dental prophylaxis, is the removal of plaque and tartar from teeth through scaling – which involves scraping off any built-up material around teeth with hand instruments or ultrasonic tools. Regular teeth cleanings also help to prevent future build up of tartar on teeth and are the number one way to prevent tooth decay and gum disease, two very common oral health issues which can cause teeth loss if not treated properly.

Why Teeth Cleanings are Important

What happens during a teeth cleaning

Your teeth will be thoroughly cleaned by your dentist or hygienist, including all surfaces and between teeth. During teeth cleanings, dentists can also perform examinations to look at overall gum health as well as x-rays to check the condition of teeth.

There are multiple steps to a dental cleaning, including:

Step #1: Examination

The first step to a teeth cleaning is a quick examination of your teeth and gums. During this exam, a small mirror will be used to look around your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay or gum disease. In some cases, you may also need to have dental x-rays taken.

Step #2: Plaque and Tartar Removal

After your mouth has been examined, a dental hygienist will start the cleaning process by removing plaque and tartar from the surface of your teeth. This includes the fronts, backs, and sides of the teeth, as well as along the gum line. There are different dental tools that may be used such as a metal scaler or an ultrasonic water scaler. If a metal scaler is used, you may hear scraping sounds as the tartar is removed. It is important to note that tartar is simply hardened dental plaque that can be prevented by proper brushing and flossing.

Step #3: Gritty Toothpaste

Next, an electrical brush will be used in coordination with a gritty toothpaste to remove any remaining tartar accumulations. As the tartar is removed, you may hear a grinding noise. No need to worry though, this is perfectly safe when performed by a dental professional.

teeth cleaning process

Step #4: Floss

The next step is to have your teeth professionally flossed. This helps to remove any leftover plaque and allows your hygienist to locate areas that you may be missing during your regular flossing routine.

Step #5: Rinse

As a final way to ensure that all the plaque, tartar, and toothpaste are removed, your mouth will be thoroughly rinsed with liquid fluoride.

Step #6: Fluoride

The final step of any teeth cleaning is to have a fluoride treatment. This can take the form of a foamy gel or sticky paste in trays. It is often flavored and is only left in place for a short amount of time. Afterwards, a fluoride varnish is painted onto your teeth. Fluoride is highly beneficial to tooth enamel because it makes the enamel stronger and makes it harder for plaque to accumulate.

In Conclusion

..teeth cleanings are important because they can prevent tooth decay and gum disease, two very common oral health issues which can cause teeth loss if not treated properly. They also provide an opportunity for your dentist or hygienist to check teeth for signs of oral cancer during the process. Regular teeth cleanings may also help you avoid costly restorative dental procedures since it minimizes their need by removing tartar buildup that could lead to these problems in the future. In honor of National Dental Hygiene Month, schedule your next dental cleaning today in order to maintain good oral hygiene!

Dr. Sam Sadati wearing black suite portrait

Dr. Sadati possesses extensive experience in all aspects of advanced restorative dentistry, with an emphasis in cosmetic and implant dentistry.  He has attained Accredited Fellow status in the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), the most rigorous, demanding credentialing process in the world. He is the only AACD Accredited Fellow in South Florida.

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